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Bass fishing has a fascinating history. It started in the late 18th century and continues to progress until today.

It probably was originally practiced in search for food among the people in the south of the United States. Since then, it has started gaining numerous audiences of all ages and nations. Today, countries such as Australia, Cuba, South Africa, United States and most of Europe participate in this kind of event.

Timelines

• The year 1768 or 1770 represents the birth of bass fishing sports. Onesimus Ustonson introduced his first multiplying reels to the fishing gurus and lovers. It was later developed into bait caster.

• William Shakespeare Jr. materializes the production of a level wind device and secured its patent on 1897.

• The William J. Jamison Co introduced the overly ornamented Shannon Twin Spinner in 1915 and was improved to create today’s spinner baits.

• In 1932, President Franklin D. Roosevelt instituted the creation of Tennessee Valley Authority and encouraged the creation and building of numerous dams. These dams were later used for culturing different varieties of bass fishes.

• Five years later, DuPont Company filed patent for nylon fishing net, this was later developed into nylon monofilament fishing line.

• The year 1992 is one of the most glorious events in the history of bass fishing. Larry Nixon, the famous fisherman in the history of bass fishing won $1 M total earnings for this sport on this year.

Bass Fish

Several fish species that are being caught in the bass fishing events are the following:

• Micropterus salmoides (Lacepede) – Largemouth Bass
• Micropterus dolomieui – Smallmouth bass
• Micropterus punctatus – Kentucky Bass

Other species of Micropterus are also caught but one that remains popular is the Largemouth bass. However, it should be emphasized that Australian Bass are different from the above North American Bass variants although most share similar features.

Perhaps, the most robust success of Bass Fishing was in the 1950s. The popularity of the game during this period is the springboard to the development of modern fishing equipments from bass boats, rods, lines, lures and various fishing gears.

Electronic gears were also incorporated among the host of equipments bass fishers used at that time. Reels of different types, which function in hauling and hoisting, were also created.

The contribution of bass fishing industry to the US economy records $50 to $70 Billion and the number continues to grow. Statistics show that the audience base of this sport is increasing and that more and more people are getting interested in it compared to tennis and golf.

Rods are basically made from carbon. Plastic, composite carbon combined with Kevlar, which is a kind of material that is bullet proof, or just high carbon. Since the carbon’s force and strength in connection to its mass is light, making it strong material that can allow thinner fabrication but still is able to keep the span and length. A rod that is lighter evidently handling will be easier, controlling it would be less tiring on ones arms and reduces resistance to air giving one an easier time accurately casting it, particularly on windy ways.

Rods go in silicon carbide , impossible chrome or metal rings having a function of letting the line pass through.These are correctly used because of their smoothness having the function to lessen friction when passing through the line and take the optimum strength.Silicon a are materials fact unnecessary , so an alternative is move into play hand-painted rings like Zircon which when taken in to account , it is usually as difficult or as heavy , but is that much cost efficient.Rings made of chrome are well , although every season they expect replacement , they get present superb job of line running.At least thirteen rings are needed from the handle all through the tip , lesser near the handle , needing only closer to the tip.The line can fasten itself to the rod , if ? don you t produce little rings.

Rods come in silicon carbide, hard chrome or ceramic rings having a function of letting the line pass through. These are precisely used because of their smoothness having the function to minimize friction when passing through the line and keep the maximum strength. Silicon materials are a fact costly, so an alternative is bring into play ceramic rings like Zircon which when taken in to account, it is not as tough or as light, but is much cost effective. Rings made of chrome are better, although every season they require replacement, they do deliver excellent job of line running. At least thirteen rings are needed from the handle all through the tip, lesser near the handle, needing more close to the tip. The line can fasten itself to the rod, if you don’t have enough rings.

When determining length of the rod, you want to take into account exactly what kind of fishing you want. If you want far out fishing, in that case choose a larger rod as this will offer you better control when you are playing the fish. If you are planning to go fishing in an area that is enclosed, you will need a shorter rod. Normally, the safe rod size to choose is13ft (3.9m). This is lengthy enough for a waggler but does not cast out too far.

Handles

Handles are made from either cork or foam. Whichever you choose, this is a matter of preference. Just try handling both materials so you can have a good “feel” before buying it.

Action

Action is the term used in describing how the rod will bend when it is placed under the lot of strain and effort of a fighting fish.

There are two types of tip on a rod, the hollow and spliced tips. Hollow tips are good in catching carp, tench and chub which have a progressive or developing action making it sharp for quick bites, yet proficient enough to manage long distance strikes. Spliced tips normally are normally spliced to the end with two feet solid carbon. This rod is sharper so it is a good pick for fast acting fish.

When choosing a rod, these questions will help you pick the right one:

1. How frequent and where do you fish? Are you a beginner, a weekend warrior, or a tournament pro? If you are just starting out, you may need to budget and spend less money on your first rod. Once you learn the techniques and once you have decided that fishing is for you, that is the time to spend on more specific rods.

2. Freshwater or Saltwater fish? While there are a few rods that can be used for both fresh and saltwater fish, most rods are made for a specific purpose and application.

3. Spinning or Casting? The species you that you choose to chase will determine it.

4. Power, sensitivity, and your technique. The rod should match the way you enjoy fishing. If you like to fish with lures, then you should look for a rod that is comfortable enough to cast frequently all day long.

Being surrounded by nature’s beauty can be fun. One can do it at the beach, in a luxury resort or just traveling out of town. Fishing is another good activity one can choose to do to bond more with either family or friends.

There will always be challenges whether one decides to fish either in the river or in the open sea. The important thing to remember is to have patience waiting for the fish and doing the best to catch it when it appears.

To be able to fish, a person needs to get a fishing license since this is requirement by law and the regulations regarding fishing varies from one state to the other.

Once that has been acquired, it is time now to get the proper equipment to start reeling in the fish.

The fishing reel was invented centuries ago. It dates back to the 17th century though some historians have discovered that the Chinese started using it as early as the 12th century. Until the 1800’s, the purpose of the reel was just a storage space for the excess line. This was later improved and various models were invented using different materials such as brass and nickel which are still in use today.

There are 2 things one should consider before buying the right reel,

1. Where will the person fish?

There are many kinds of fishing reels available. The model used for fishing in the river or stream is quite different from those who have experience and go fishing as a sport in the open sea.

It is advisable for beginners to just get the basic package and have fun before moving on to more advanced equipment.

2. Will buying a fishing reel fit within ones budget?

With the many models available and after figuring out what kind of fishing reel one needs, it all depends on how much it costs and if that person is willing to spend it. Fishing takes a lot of practice before being able to excel at it. One can purchase a new reel either online or at the local store. Another way to get started could be buying a second hand reel first before deciding to buy a brand new one.

Being an expert at fishing won’t happen in one day. It takes practice and patience just waiting for that fish to appear and finally play it out when it appears. One should always remember that in the water and with people, it is all about having fun.

There will always be challenges whether one decides to fish either in the river or in the open sea. The important thing to remember is to have patience waiting for the fish and doing your best to catch it when it appears.

To be able to fish, a person needs to get a fishing license since this is a requirement by law and the regulations regarding fishing varies from one state to the other.

The first thing one needs for salt water fishing is a boat. It can range from a simple row boat to a yacht. The size of this vessel depends on how many people will join the trip.

For people who will do it in-shore, a 15 foot sailboat that comes with a cuddy forward to serve as a shelter when it rains should do the job. The boat should not be heavy and yet adequately sturdy to not be swayed by the action of strong waves or some bumps on the beach or on the rocks.

One should always try the edges of the perimeter first instead of plopping bait or lure in the middle. This is because it will scare the other fish away. By going through the sides first, one will have a better chance of catching unsuspecting fish in the middle.

If one decides to go “down below” some time, a cod-line is a necessity for everybody to enjoy saltwater fishing. A perch-line will also be good and if it’s time for mackerel fishing, a mackerel jig will be an excellent help.

The right time to start salt water fishing is on the ebb tide. This should be during an early time of the morning to ensure that the trip will be a productive one. This will put the tide in one’s favor and if the wind is light or not fair, this will also help in going home quickly.

The best place to start fishing is going to a fishing ground that is well known to the locals.

Many anglers who are too impatient move from one spot to another which at times make these people miss a hotspot further decreasing the chances of catching fish. It is advisable to cast out a couple of times before moving on using different types of bait. This should be done from the shallowest to the deepest point.

Sharks in the area can disrupt people from catching fish. By pouring some fish blood on a paper towel or newspaper and rolling it into a ball then casting it overboard, sharks will follow the current and leave the area increasing the chances of catching fish.

Fishing is a fun and tranquil sport that lets you spend quiet time with your friends, family and with Mother Nature.

Fresh water fishing is a sport involving the catching of fish in lakes, rivers and streams. It involves a lot of patience, challenge and a lot of acquired skill over time. Anyone can participate in this fun activity, including the kids.

To start, you have to check your State’s fishing requirements and make sure if a license is needed for you to fish. If it is required, you must acquire one by checking with a sporting goods store. They will help you how to get it, and some will even provide it for you.

During the time that you are in your favorite sporting goods store, you can look around and buy the right fishing equipment that you will be need for your trip. Considering that you are a beginner, make sure that you budget well the cost and your spending on the equipment, not deciding on expensive equipments; buy only the basic things you will need.

When in doubt as to what is needed, ask the help of the store keeper, but do keep in mind that you need to stick to a budget. Take your time and don’t hesitate to ask how to use each piece of equipment that is offered to you. Artificial lures for bait can be used or you can simply look for worms from your back yard.

An inexpensive fishing rod and reel will be enough along with a fishing line, hooks, weights, a bobber (this keeps your line afloat), fishing lures and net. A polarized sunglass is also essential, as it will help to see clearly through the water and lessen the glare.

Then if you don’t know the good locations to fish, ask about local “hot” spots, or check your State’s fishing regulations for information about fishing locations around your State.

The time will surely come when you will be a better fisherman; then you may decide on upgrading your equipment. In the meantime, keep things simple.

It is always advised that you avoid fishing alone. Always be with a friend, as when emergency strikes, there can be someone who can call for help.

It is wise to start fishing in shallow waters. Aim your cast in shady or rocky areas where the water is deep, as this is where the fish is expected to be found. Keep in mind that this is all practice first.

As your skill level develops and increases, you can then attempt into deeper waters. But before going, take the time to practice casting to familiarize yourself with your rod and your reel.

What better place to practice than your back yard. To do so, mark off an area using a rope and use this as your guide in aiming your cast. Rehearse and study your movements to discover a method that will work for you. Bear in mind, cast with your wrist, and not with your arm.

Fishing hooks are very sharp and needed to be handled with care to avoid injury. Before casting, it is important that you should look around you and stay unobstructed to avoid hurting other people with your hook.

When the right time has come and you go fishing for real, keep in mind to cast your line always ahead of the fish, making your bait land slowly, with as little splash as possible. The fish will see well at a close point, but cannot see behind.

If your casts are going in a disorganized manner, move closer to the water so you can gain better accuracy.

Watch the bobber closely for any movement. If and when a fish grabs the bait, the bobber will be pulled under water. This signals that you got a fish on the line. Don’t get too excited. Remain calm.

Keeping your line tight, slowly reel in your catch. Place the net near and use it to bring the fish out. Remove the hook from the fish with great care.

If you got an undersized fish (as noted in the state’s regulation book), quickly return it to the water. Likewise, if you have no intention in eating your catch, do not waste it and return it to the water. Releasing the fish will supply the water with more fish, giving future fishermen the thrill to experience a catch.

Lastly, look around you and feel the calm, restful and serene view of the river.

Have fun!

Careful planning and preparation is all it takes to make ice fishing the greatest time of your life or the worst. Easy? Take a look at the following tips and see how prepared you are to catch those fish!

Buy early

Make a list of the supplies you used last season and replenish them early. Make sure you get all those Glo-Buster Bluelights or Lindy Tazers. All you need to remember is four words: wise up, stock up.

Check the hole on the ice floor

Simply put, make sure the hole is clean. Chips or chunks of ice could cause entanglements in one’s fishing line and could make you catch fish or literally break your chances of getting any, as these could sever the line therefore losing your chance of getting that trophy of a lifetime bluegill. Remember to keep the hole clear of any barrier.

Fish more, get the big four

The bait you simply cannot go on without: wax worms, minnows, assorted PowerBait, maggots. It is best to keep these bait separated and as much as possible alive using coolers such as a small Coleman.

Clean `em all up

Inspect and clean the rods and fishing reels you are going to use. Q-tips are best for taking out the nicks in every nook and cranny of your ice rod. Non-freezing oil for lubing fishing reels is advisable.

Heat up

Do not forget to bring those heaters and pounds and pounds of propane cylinders. One cannot fish comfortably if he or she is as cold as the fish under the ice. Ice fishing should be fun and feel comfy too.

House up

The ice is harsh and cold but it doesn’t mean you have to feel that too. Ice tents should be cleaned out as well by putting over a light coat of lubricant at the joints. If there is any wear or tear, it is best to contact the manufacturer in order for them to send out the appropriate repair kit, as deemed necessary.

Gear Up

Better be safe than sorry, make sure you get a set of lifeguard spikes as well as a safety rope. Also, to feel less of the cold and at the same time be cool, pick up a fishing coat from the Carhartt Extremes Arctic Jacket. Avoid frost bits on your toes and feet, the best shoes are the Irish Setters Versa Trax to keep you warm all over.

You have decided that you want to learn to fish. There are several ways of learning, the hardest being trial and error. It would be best to find an instructor for one-on-one lessons.

1. Buy seasickness medication

Nothing is worse than ruining your fishing because of seasickness. Most seasickness medication e.g. Bonine would be fine. Even seasoned fishermen are known to take some on rough days. Take one before you go to sleep, another when you wake up and a third one before you board.

2. Buy a reference book
A lot of good books are available at your bookstores and online. The book should give you instructions as well as terms and definitions. Some things you may not immediately understand but you should know anyway. Learn how to tie different kinds of knots. This knowledge will be invaluable for other purposes throughout your life.

3. Go to a party

There are party boats that carry from fifteen to as many as sixty anglers. The boat provides everything like bait, rod, reel, sinkers and hooks. They assist you in fishing and take the fish off the hook for you. Mates will spot you and will generally stay close to assist you. Party boats generally will cost you $25 – $70 a day, and the fish are yours to keep. The party boat is a bargain for beginners.

4. Pick your pier

Assuming you have already acquired skills to operate a rod and reel, you need to look for a fishing pier.
Majority of coastal cities have one public pier or pay-to-fish pier. You can rent tackle and buy bait at the piers. If you’re having trouble, there are many pier anglers willing to help and give you tips.

5. Party or pier

You may want to do either step three or four or both at this point. The best thing to do is to do both several times to really learn.

6. The reel deal

The conventional reel is probably what you’re using up to this point. The conventional reel is designed for a lot of wear and tear. You may now want to consider other types and makes of reels. Ideally you have met people and perhaps made a friend or two who can assist you in selecting a reel. You can even ask a tackle shop owner for tips.

You need to understand the mechanics of the reel and the other equipment. Learning to cast, tie knots and bait are not that complicated. Secondly, you need to learn where to fish. Successful fishermen know where the fish are located. Fish move from place to place and knowledgeable anglers understand these patterns and are able to anticipate where the fish are located.

There is such an assortment of bait that it is difficult to recommend any particular color, size, or type as the best. There are more than a thousand good baits on the market. All will catch fish at some time or another.

Fishing baits usually weigh from ¼ to an ounce to three ounces. The most popular weight preferred by the majority of bait casters is the 5/8-ounce bait, while the average is between ½ and 3 quarters of an ounce. Baits can either be used as a whole or cut into chunks. Anglers can also use dead or live baits.

The Different Types of Bait

There is a wide array of organisms being used as fishing baits. Among the different types used in fishing, the commonly used are the small fishes. These consist of widely used fishing baits such as herring, anchovies, menhaden, and some others that are inborn to certain local waters. Larger fishes are usually used as chunk baits.

Fishing baits can be used whole, chunk, and strips, based on the activities of the type of fishes being chased. The size of the fishing bait is usually well matched with the size of the fish being hunted. Other common organisms used for bait fishing are crabs, worms, shrimps, crabs, clams, sand fleas, eels, and squid. Among all of the organisms mentioned, the crabs and the shrimps are the well-liked organisms to be used as fishing baits.

Shrimp are favorably used as fishing bait and are considered to be very valuable bait for a huge number of saltwater fish, especially those that are considered “inshore fish” like redfish, speckled trout, shook, and a lot more.

Whereas, various crab species, especially the fiddler crab, sand flea, and the blue crab, are perfect fishing baits for many varieties of “inshore fishes” and “bottom fish.” These crabs are usually clasped through their shell, usually on either the right or left of the head.

How to Acquire Fishing Bait?

Fishermen can acquire fishing bait either buying them in bait shops or simply by capturing it themselves.

The advantage of buying fishing bait is convenience, while catching live fishing bait is less expensive and can be more effective in luring fish. Digging for earthworms is another activity. Earthworms make an excellent bait.

Indeed, when it comes to bait fishing, using the proper fishing bait are important and imperative to the success of fishing. Hence, anglers should know the basics of choosing fishing baits in order to save time and money.

Today’s fishing rods have incorporated modern features that are not typical of the more primitive cane pole. Modern fishing rods contain reels, which aid in the retrieval of fish caught in its bait.

A much-sophisticated feature is the spinning rod where the entire shaft of the rod except the handle can move around on its axis to allow flexibility when fish caught on snare bait struggles through the water.

Like the classic cane fishing rods, the fishing gadget is thick at the handle (bottom) and is tapered and thinner at the tip. This very basic design allows handling stability and flexible movement of the entire length of the shaft.

Types of Fishing Rods and Specifications

A typical fishing rod measures 6 and 16 feet (2 and 5 m) and vary in capability to tolerate strain in fishing activity. The length has a lot to do with withstanding force exerted by the fish to the pole and determines for the most part the performance of rods used for angling.

Cane Poles

Cane poles are one of the smallest and less sophisticated gadgets in fishing. It is usually made of bamboo or other flexible wood material with the most basic fly line attached to it.

Unlike other more sophisticated fishing rods, cane poles do not usually contain reels or its equivalent to be used for reeling in or retrieving fish caught on bait. This very same action is known as angling.

Spinning Rods

These types of rods are the most popular today. They can be used either for heavyweight or lightweight fish although they were proven best for trout, walleye and bass fish. They vary in measurements from 5 and 7 feet (1.5 and 2.5 m).

Spinning poles are commonly used in bass fishing competition accounting for their flexibility and tolerance to stress. They accommodate bigger and tougher fly lines and stabilize them to avoid line tangles during uncoiling of float lines.

Jigging Rods

These rods are best for heavy lures and baits especially when reaching around 180 to 200 feet under the ocean’s surface. They are made of fine, solid materials which accounts to their heaviness. The use of jigging rods is specifically due to alternating currents during the fishing activity.

Some oceans have erratic undersea current. That is why the bait and fly lines should be kept in place. Lures are also disturbed and cause confusion among fish if the lines are not long and heavy enough to withstand and tolerate water currents under the sea.

These rods are best for target fishes usually found dwelling at the bottom of the sea such as halibut and cods.

Deep sea fishing is a wonderful and extremely enjoyable activity. Here are some tips that will make your salt water fishing adventure even better.

1. Watch the signs

If you see birds e.g. Seagulls that are feasting on small bait-type fishes, there are probably larger game-type fish below the surface of the water. Also, look for floating wood or debris. In most cases when you chance upon a large floating wood, you would find a large game fish in the area even encountering dolphin.

2. Stop, Snook and Listen

Fishing for snooks is quite similar as fishing for bass. Snooks like to be around ledges, posts and rocks.

3. Crabs for full moon

During full moons use soft crab imitations as bait. That’s the time when crabs shed their shells and stripers come looking for them.

4. If you’re looking for tunas, find the dolphins

Yellowfin tuna are usually found schooling with dolphins. So if you see a group of dolphins, chances are there are some tuna in the area.

5. Cut and Burn

If you have trouble cutting through a spiderwire braid, try using a lighter or a match.

6. Good Reef

The best place to fish is near reefs since big game fish feed on fish that live on reefs.

7. The Circle Hook

Use a circle hook if you would like a higher hook up ratio. These hooks guarantees more catch, because of the minute gap, and the reverse point. They are generally better for the fish since they do not hook in the gut just the lip.

8. Don’t have sea legs

Watch the horizon and stay on deck. These would generally help you if you’re having trouble with sea sickness: Stay away from the boat fumes, breathing it only exacerbates the problem.

9. Anchors away

When your anchor is stuck at the bottom, try attaching a float to it. Return after the tide has changed in direction. This should be enough to loosen the anchor.

10. Fish where the fish are

A lot of fisherman have the idea that they should be catching their live baits over the reefs before going to deep waters. If the live baits are not in the area you’re planning to catch the larger games, then why would you come up with the idea that the large fish are there. Wouldn’t they be in the area where the bait fish are?

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